How to win with digital content

How to win with digital content

There is a huge misconception in the business world that I feel obligated to challenge—or just downright destroy. It’s a myth that isn’t so much spoken or even believed, but one that’s lived out daily, monthly and yearly. And it’s costing companies millions of dollars.

What is this tragic lack of knowledge? It’s what I like to call, “We already did that.”

Why your digital marketing isn't working

I wanted to share a quick video about why your digital marketing might be failing or missing the mark. I see a lot of companies and brands putting out content, but the content isn't doing what they want it to do. So what's wrong? Is it the Facebook Ads, is it the website, is it the photo, the video, the emails? What's stopping your digital marketing campaign from succeeding? 

Give this video a watch and maybe you'll be able to figure it out!

Photography as a Hobby After Being Injured

Photography as a Hobby After Being Injured

An accident can change your life. Along with the physical injury you suffer, like a broken leg or a torn tendon, you can also suffer mentally and emotionally from the accident. Some accident victims develop conditions like depression or anxiety after their accidents or find themselves limited by phobias related to their original incidents. Others become angry and frustrated with their new limitations and the sense that they are unfairly suffering, that they “did everything right” and still suffered because of random circumstances and others’ negligence.


Create content custom to your use.

Create content custom to your use.

When we get asked to create content for companies they usually think of create a single video or a couple of photos they can use on their website and social media. I don’t blame them for that. It’s obviously a common content plan. A terrible one, but a common one non the less. 

It’s only after I explain why it’s a terrible idea do they start to really understand.


Maybe your social media problem isn’t the problem at all

Maybe your social media problem isn’t the problem at all

When potential clients reach out to us, the conversation often sounds a lot like, “We just need some help with our social media. We’re OK with everything else.” 

That sounds like a reasonable way to start a conversation, but the problem is it’s almost always wrong. They aren’t “OK with everything else.” In most cases, their “everything else” is so bad we can’t actually help them with what they think their need is—until we help them fix the larger problem.

How to craft a good press release or newsy article.

writingpressrelease.jpg

In our last article, we talked about how to get good coverage in your local newspaper, particularly how it’s not about luck but rather about following a strong recipe for crafting and pitching press releases the right way.  

Once you know your basics (see previous article here), it’s time to focus on the mainstay of your coverage: the press release. Press releases (or media releases) are a huge part of what you’ll see in print. Sometimes the newspaper will pick up the full release, tweak it a tad, then pop it in with very few changes. Other times, they will use it as a catalyst for a deeper, fuller article they do themselves. (And if it’s bad, they might even chuck it altogether.)

What is a press release vs. an article?

A press release (sometimes called a media release) is a very basic mini article about your news. It can be about something that happened, is happening, or will happen. 

An article is more extensive and longer, and it’s about a fuller topic than “just” an event—maybe your company just sent 10 people to bring your product and minister in an inner city, and wow, do they have a tale to tell! It has a more creative lead, though still communicates the news up front.

What are the elements of a good press release?

  • Hook the reporter or editor with an angle that is unique and compelling.
  • Straightforward; presents news on a silver platter that journalists can immediately recognize as interesting/essential
  • Say important stuff first: 5 Ws and H—who, what, where, when, why and how.
  • Audience is key. What will their people want? It has nothing to do with you or your ministry.
  • No hype, no selling, just the facts. Stay away from phrases like “unique,” “wonderful,” “uplifting,” “state-of-the-art,” etc. unless it’s in a quote.
  • Third-person perspective. Never use “I” or “we” unless it’s in a quote.
  • Shorter is better—one page.
  • List your full church name and city
  • Give a contact person

What are the elements of a good article?

  • Hook the reporter or editor with an angle that is unique and compelling.
  • More creative lede (first sentence) but get to the point right away with the 5 Ws and H
  • Three sources quoted
  • Longer, but not too long. A page or two max.
  • No hype unless it’s in a quote.
  • Third-person perspective. Never use “I” or “we” unless it’s in a quote.
  • List your full church name and city
  • Give a contact person

How to get good coverage in your local newspaper

How to get good coverage in your local newspaper

Digital marketing is a key element to today's successful businesses, but don't let that distract you from the need for connecting with traditional media outlets like your local newspaper to get great press coverage of events, news or product launches. In many cases, if you're doing your digital marketing correctly, not only will you attract the attention of traditional media outlets, but the newspaper coverage will also help increase your digital marketing presence, as well. Here are some tips and tricks to help get you more newspaper coverage.

A story of utter failure

A story of utter failure

It’s ironic that one of the biggest video projects we’ve created, with the most views on social media, is also a project I consider a failure. It’s a failure not because it didn’t perform, but because it didn’t perform to its potential. The company spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to bring a product to market and thousands of dollars to create outstanding content to promote their product—and yet they literally spent no money, time, or effort in marketing their content.